Researchers discover brain circuit that precisely mediates setting of memories and behaviors

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Scientists at The Neuro (Montreal Neurological Institute-Hospital Health Sciences Centre and Centre de recherche de lEst-de-lle-de-Montral (NRS-H-MS-CNRS) Canada have discovered an important new brain circuit which which gives you the precise counterbalances that allows you to remember well your past. Results from this pioneering venture were published in the journal Nature next week.

Our brain has four types of neurons with different functions: reflecting reasoning memory and motivation. The function of the central inhibitory circuit is crucial because it is one of the first to be affected in adolescence. A figure showing its exact location was shown for the first time by scientists Dr. Jacor Lambon and Professor Francois Hallinan who managed to show that the cognitive enhancement of these new neurons occurs because they are activated by a neuron network in the somatosensory system which is an area located at the back of the brain.

Now that we have a better map of the brain functions concerned with preventing mistakes its simple to say which of the 32 segments of the core inhibitory circuit are fully active at any given time. This gives us a better map of which memory areas are active and which intact. Evidence indicates that we would receive loss signals while performing cognitive tasks but our function allows us to not analyse the situation because our brains are so powerful says Jacor Lambon head of the Positron Emission Tomography Laboratory at The Neuro (Montreal Neurological Institute-Hospital Health Sciences Centre and Centre de recherche de lEst-de-lle-de-Montral (NRS-H-MS-CNRS).

More than 10 years in the making The Neuro (Montreal Neurological Institute-Hospital Health Sciences Centre and Centre de recherche de lEst-de-lle-de-Montral (NRS-H-MS-CNRS) has set out to prove that this circuit has two states: In the case of relevance for example for accessing and carrying out an important task. In the case of non-relevance the circuits are switched loosely in favour of a back-and-forth dialogue between the two types.

Until now we knew that some neural networks prefer to activate when the information is in the most salient parts of the brain. This could be related to the preference for details associated with tasks that are relevant to the user such as making decisions and completing ones tasks.

Participants with different affective states for example prefer to activate the memory region that is closest to the action they are taking as well as the memory region that is most active when they are distracted.

This research has revealed a specific brain circuit that seems to switch back and forth between remembering under current scenarios and not. The precise way the new mouse brain distinguishes if you are recalling under your breath or not is the major focus. But before we can say whether exactly this is how it helps us in remembering our previous knowledge says Jacor Lambon.